Subscribe to our Blog

Click Here

Now viewing articles in the category Watershed Management.

  • PWW Watershed Cleanup

    June 14th, 2018 by Rob Cote


     

    For over 20 years, CEI has worked closely with Pennichuck Water Works on water quality and watershed protection initiatives. Projects have ranged from the engineering and construction of best management practices, sediment studies, long-term management planning, and public education. But it’s not all business, this past Saturday CEI joined forces with Pennichuck on a beautiful day for their 1st Annual Watershed Cleanup Event! With CEI serving as a Platinum Sponsor, the group set out early Saturday morning in an effort to

     

    Read More

  • CEI Receives Prequalification for Geotechnical Services

    May 21st, 2018 by Rob Cote


     

    CEI is proud to announce the expansion of the firms’ prequalified services for the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT) to now include Geotechnical services. CEI was recently approved for this new discipline adding to the existing categories of bridge design, roadway design, hydraulics & hydrology, hazardous waste remediation, wetlands and water quality.

     CEI has successfully completed dozens of task orders for MassDOT through the years that have included stormwater BMP design, regulatory review, statewide guidance development, and water resource consulting.

     

     

    Read More

  • Top 6 Invasive Aquatic Plants in New England

    March 28th, 2018 by Bob Hartzel


    New England’s lakes and ponds host a great variety of native plants that are an important part of a healthy aquatic ecosystem.  Non-native species can disrupt these ecosystems by spreading aggressively and displacing beneficial native species.  These plants can also impair swimming, boating, and fishing, and can contribute to water quality problems as large amounts of organic matter decay at the end of each growing season. 

    The guide below summarizes the key identifying features of the six non-native plants most commonly found in New England lakes and ponds.

     

    Variable milfoil (Myriophyllum heterophyllum)

    Variable watermilfoil is a submerged aquatic plant that grows in depths of up to 15 feet.  This plant has reddish stems with whorls of 4-6 feather-like leaves that are about 2 inches long and 1 inch wide.  As shown in the photo, the plant also produces a prominent spike-like flower (3-6 inches long) that emerges above the water surface by late June or July.

     

    Read More

  • 5 Municipal Regulatory Tools to Protect Water Quality

    March 21st, 2018 by Bob Hartzel


     

    Regulatory tools are “non-structural” practices that can be an effective component of your long-term plan to control watershed pollution sources. The general categories of local controls that can be used to protect water resources are summarized below, followed by a table with links to example municipal ordinances.

               

    1. Zoning: Zoning ordinances are used to regulate the land use activities and development density allowed in each section of a town. Zoning regulations typically applies only to future site development and redevelopment.

    2. Subdivision Regulations establish requirements and review procedures for developments of two or more units. Like zoning ordinances, they typically apply only to new development and redevelopment. These regulations often include requirements for site plan review, to ensure that the project plans comply with all regulations. 

    3. Board of Health Regulations may be enacted where existing state laws are determined to be insufficient for the protection of public health. For example, Boards of Health can regulate septic systems more stringently than required under state law, and can further regulate the use, storage and handling of fuel and other hazardous materials in specified areas. 

    Read More

  • The 5 Most Important Things to Know About Water Quality Monitoring

    January 26th, 2018 by Bob Hartzel


    Collecting reliable water quality data is one of the most important aspects of protecting and developing management plans for our rivers and lakes. Monitoring data can be used to understand the type and severity of water quality impairments and help in setting achievable targets for improvement. Water quality monitoring can also indicate long-term trends and identify critical thresholds that are approaching, such as increasing phosphorus levels that could result in frequent algae blooms if not addressed. Five key considerations for design of a water quality monitoring program are summarized below.

    1. Program Objectives

    What questions should the data answer?

    1. Practical Considerations

    Fit your data collection objectives to your budget, with careful consideration of the cost and value of each parameter. What are the statistical and data quality requirements?

    1. Monitoring Locations

    The number and location of high-priority monitoring locations will vary depending on the waterbody type, watershed size, and data goals. At a minimum, consider establishing river and tributary monitoring locations just upstream of the confluence points with your focus waterbody or river segment. For lakes and ponds, establish a “deep-spot” monitoring location for each major basin.

     

     

     

    Read More