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  • CEI Presents - Stormwater BMPs

    June 6th, 2018 by Rob Cote


     

    As part of a Specialty Conference Series, the New England Water Environment Association (NEWEA) hosted a Stormwater Specialty Conference & Exhibit: "Enhancing Stormwater Resilience in the Built Environment". At this technical conference, CEI's own Nick Cristofori, P.E. gave an informative presentation on the Design and Construction of Resilient Stormwater BMPs to Address Climate Change and Improve Water Quality

     

     

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  • NPDES MS4 Notice of Intent

    May 29th, 2018 by Nick Cristofori


     

    With the NPDES MS4 Notice of Intent (NOI) filing due in only 4 months, EPA has compiled a training video to assist communities with completing the form.  The NOI forms the basis of your Phase II program and lists the Best Management Practices (BMPs) you will implement to meet permit requirements, identifies responsible parties for each proposed measure, along with other supporting tasks.  The video is approximately 30 minutes long and generally discusses how to do the following:

    • Complete each section of the NOI;
    • Meet endangered species and historic property requirements; and
    • File with EPA and state agency. 

     

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  • CEI Receives Prequalification for Geotechnical Services

    May 21st, 2018 by Rob Cote


     

    CEI is proud to announce the expansion of the firms’ prequalified services for the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT) to now include Geotechnical services. CEI was recently approved for this new discipline adding to the existing categories of bridge design, roadway design, hydraulics & hydrology, hazardous waste remediation, wetlands and water quality.

     CEI has successfully completed dozens of task orders for MassDOT through the years that have included stormwater BMP design, regulatory review, statewide guidance development, and water resource consulting.

     

     

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  • Are You Ready for MS4?

    May 16th, 2018 by Nick Cristofori


     

    Only a little over 7 weeks remain until the new NPDES MS4 permit becomes effective!  Are you ready?

     

    By now, hopefully you’re aware that the new permit goes into effect July 1, 2018 and “starts the clock” on completion of Year-1 requirements.  Even though the first action item, the Notice of Intent (NOI), isn’t due until September 29, 2018, we highly recommend that you begin its preparation during the next couple months.  

     

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  • 5 Municipal Regulatory Tools to Protect Water Quality

    March 21st, 2018 by Bob Hartzel


     

    Regulatory tools are “non-structural” practices that can be an effective component of your long-term plan to control watershed pollution sources. The general categories of local controls that can be used to protect water resources are summarized below, followed by a table with links to example municipal ordinances.

               

    1. Zoning: Zoning ordinances are used to regulate the land use activities and development density allowed in each section of a town. Zoning regulations typically applies only to future site development and redevelopment.

    2. Subdivision Regulations establish requirements and review procedures for developments of two or more units. Like zoning ordinances, they typically apply only to new development and redevelopment. These regulations often include requirements for site plan review, to ensure that the project plans comply with all regulations. 

    3. Board of Health Regulations may be enacted where existing state laws are determined to be insufficient for the protection of public health. For example, Boards of Health can regulate septic systems more stringently than required under state law, and can further regulate the use, storage and handling of fuel and other hazardous materials in specified areas. 

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  • The 9 Most Important Features of a Watershed Plan

    January 23rd, 2018 by Bob Hartzel


     

    A Watershed-Based Plan (WBP) is intended to provide watershed-specific information and analyses that will promote actions to protect and restore water quality. Development of a “9-element” WBP is a requirement for watershed restoration and water quality protection projects seeking federal funding under Section 319 of the Clean Water Act. The 9 WBP elements are summarized below.

     

    1. Identify the causes and sources of pollution that will need to be controlled to achieve water quality goals for the watershed.

    2. Determine the pollutant reductions needed to achieve water quality goals for the watershed.

    3. Describe the management actions needed to achieve the targeted pollutant load reductions and identification of critical areas where those actions will be implemented.

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  • 4 Things you should do now for MS4 compliance and some you shouldn't!

    January 19th, 2018 by Nick Cristofori


    As you’re probably aware, the 2016 NPDES MS4 stormwater permit goes into effect July 1, 2018 for both Massachusetts and New Hampshire.  Now that we’re into 2018, this date is barely 5 months away!  Between now and then, there are a few items that you should work on (and maybe a few you shouldn’t) to make the transition to the new permit easier.  See below for more info.


    Item 1.  Evaluate Your Program and Budget for Implementation

    Everyone knows that meeting the MS4 permit requirements will cost money, but how much?  The short answer is, “it depends”.  What have you done so far and where do you need to go?  If you don’t know the answer to these questions, you would benefit from evaluating your existing program as it relates to 2003 and 2016 permit requirements.  This will help you determine where your gaps are and recommendations for future work.  Once you know these answers, you can determine program costs for implementation, even on a yearly basis.  This is a good first step for virtually any community. 


    Item 2.  Make Sure you Meet the 2003 Permit Requirements

    Did you know? – There are 3 different bylaws or ordinances that were required under the 2003 permit:

    • Illicit Discharge, Detection and Elimination (IDDE)
    • Construction/Erosion and Sediment Control
    • Post-Construction Stormwater Management

    These were required to be in place by May 1, 2008, nearly 10 years ago.  If these aren’t in place now, your community is in non-compliance.  In fact, EPA even asks about the status of each one on the first page of the upcoming Notice of Intent (NOI) Submittal, so they’ll be checking to see that these were met.  If these aren’t in place, your community should be working towards meeting these requirements, particularly the IDDE and erosion and sediment control ones, as requirements for these items are the same under the new permit as the old one. 

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  • Top 10 Differences Between the 2003 and 2016 Massachusetts MS4 Permit

    July 29th, 2016 by Eileen Pannetier


    As you may be aware, there are many differences between than 2003 and 2016 MS4 permit. CEI has been analyzing the changes, and to help simplify a complicated permit, we’ve boiled down the most significant changes to 10. Here they are:

    1. The 2016 permit has very specific public outreach and participation requirements, divided by audience and with definitive requirements for distribution. This may be something you will can do using materials created by your regional planning agency, MassDEP or EPA.

    2. The requirements for regulatory changes include incorporation of specific design requirements for new development and redevelopment largely tied to the Massachusetts Stormwater Handbook. Previously, regulations were required but did not specify design criteria and many communities did not implement any subdivision or site plan requirements.

     

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  • The Use of LRA's to Avoid MCP Notification

    March 18th, 2015 by Rick Cote, P.E., LSP


    I introduced Limited Removal Actions (LRAs) as a potential option for avoiding notification in my “Reporting Releases under the MCP – 120-Day Notification” post. LRAs are allowed under certain circumstances where the release meets the 120-day notification criteria, and the total volume of soils for removal and treatment/disposal is less than:

    • 100 cubic yards of soil contaminated solely by a release of oil or waste oil; and

    • 20 cubic yards of soil contaminated by a release of hazardous material or a mixture of oil or waste oil and hazardous material.

    If these criteria are met then a LRA can be accomplished without oversight or reporting. However, it must be completed within 120 days of the discovery of the release and certain records must be kept.

    A LRA may NOT be used if:

    • The release or threat of release requires 2 or 72 hour notification; or

    • MassDEP has already been notified.

    A few more intricacies of an LRA – if greater volumes of contaminated soil are encountered during the LRA, MassDEP must be notified within the 120-day time frame and remedial actions must cease or approval sought to continue the removal actions as a Release Abatement Measure (RAM). Finally, records of the LRA must be kept for a minimum of 5-years and must include post-action oil and/or hazardous material concentrations and the volume and chemical characterization of excavated soils.

    For more information about CEI’s spill assessment and hazardous waste remediation services please contact Rick Cote, P.E., LSP directly at 800.725.2550x302 or rcote@ceiengineers.com or Rebecca Balke, P.E. at rbalke@ceiengineers.com.  

    Visit us at www.ceiengineers.com

  • Is Your SPCC Plan In Place for an Emergency?

    August 12th, 2014 by Eileen Pannetier


    Do you have a Spill Prevention, Control and Countermeasures (SPCC) Plan? If so, is it up to date with the best available information? If not, you could be subject to penalties and fines. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) recently fined several facilities in New England anywhere from $3,000 to $10,000 for failing to have an adequate SPCC Plan in place. In some cases, these fines can exceed the cost to prepare the SPCC Plan itself, not to mention the headaches, legal fees and negative publicity.

    You are required to have an SPCC Plan if your facility stores either more than 1,320 gallons of oil in aboveground containers or more than 42,000 gallons in underground tanks and could potentially discharge oil into waters of the United States. Municipal facilities that are typically subject to these requirements include highway garages, transfer stations and recycling centers, where fueling, maintenance and/or waste oil collection are commonly performed. Plans generally outline where oil is stored, spill prevention practices, and response measures to implement in the event of a release. 

    A successful plan should be written so that information is easy to locate when needed the most - during an emergency. Unfortunately, that isn’t always the case and important emergency information often gets buried with the administrative requirements of the plan.

    CEI specializes in creating plans that are comprehensive but functional. Components may include a stand-alone “Action Plan”, focusing on facility inspections and spill response for use by workers in the facility and development of “Emergency Response Cards” or posters designed to hang on the wall near each oil storage location. Cards provide the most pertinent information for each storage area, including what is stored there, emergency response procedures and contacts, inspection and maintenance requirements, and a detailed map of the area showing the locations of oil containers and spill response equipment. These provide an invaluable quick reference in the event of an emergency, avoiding the need to locate and read through a lengthy written plan.

    For more information or examples of any of the materials referenced above, please contact Nick Cristofori, P.E. at 800.725.2550 x303, ncristofori@ceiengineers.com, or Rebecca Balke, P.E. at x308, rbalke@ceiengineers.com or visit www.ceiengineers.com for information on other services we offer.

  • Staying Ahead of Stormwater Phase II

    April 16th, 2014 by Eileen Pannetier


    Like the rest of us, you are probably wondering when the new NPDES Phase II stormwater permit will be released.  Draft permits have been in the works, and reworked, since as early as 2008, with the latest draft issued in NH in 2013.  EPA has indicated that the new Massachusetts draft will be released soon, followed by the final permit for NH later this year.  However, based on history, this could be anywhere from a month to several years.  Only time will tell.

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  • Arsenic In Drinking Water

    April 7th, 2014 by Eileen Pannetier


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  • ASTM Phase I vs. MCP Phase I

    March 28th, 2014 by Stephanie Hanson


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  • Happy Spring!

    March 21st, 2014 by Eileen Pannetier


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